Review: The Girl on the Train

So, you’ve read the book, seen the film…now it’s time for the stage version of The Girl on the Train.

There were certainly big shoes to fill with this much loved thriller, but thankfully this latest rendition of The Girl on the Train doesn’t disappoint.

Filled with twists and turns from start to finish, this thrilling tale keeps you guessing throughout.

The show begins with an introduction into protagonist Rachel Watson’s life in a shabby kitchen cluttered with empty bottles and takeaway cartons.

The audience then discovers how she has created an idealised vision of a ‘perfect’ life – witnessed each day from her train is the catalyst for what takes place. The line between reality and fantasy becomes more blurred by her constant drinking.

All is not what it seems though as it appears the green is not always greener on the other side.

Stand out performances come from Ex- Eastender Samantha Womack, who is exceptional as Rachel.

Throughout the production, Rachel seeks escapism through the happy and in love couple she secretly watches each day. Things become more complicated though, when she finds out the woman has suddenly disappeared, she finds herself as a witness and even a suspect drawn into their world.

Former Corrie star, Oliver Farnworth, also gives an impressive performance, along with John Dougall as DI Gaskill, Naeem Hayatt as Kamal Abdic, Adam Jackson-Smith as Tom Watson, Lowenna Melrose as Anna Watson, and Kirsty Oswald as Megan Hipwell.

The quality acting is complimented by the sets, designed by James Cotterill to reflect the dark hole that Rachel talks about in her memory as she loses her grip on her identity. So the action takes place in confined spaces, like living rooms and kitchens, a police cell, an interrogation room – only really going outdoors to the wasteland by the train tracks where the body is found.

Continue your journey with The Girl on The Train and be sure to grab a ticket!

The Girl on the Train runs until Saturday February 9.

Tickets: 02380 711811 or online at mayflower.org.uk.

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